‘The Trouble with The English’: Mau Mau’s Place in The Present Debate about Imperial Legacies

By Niels Boender The sudden ubiquitousness of debates about historical memory, driven by important awakenings regarding systematic injustices, have thrust historians to the centre of what is now popularly called ‘the culture wars’. This offers an opportunity for historians to share their findings in ways that palpably impact understandings of global and national histories, as […]

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Problems in Contemporary Oral History

By Paul Feeney Oral history has grown exponentially in academic and public spheres from the 1960s to the present day. As historians focused less on the “great men” of history and moved towards the study of ordinary people, the discipline became increasingly democratised and helped to advocate for social change in the present. By giving […]

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