“Right of Dominion”?: A Comparative Analysis of Legal Doctrine in the Colonial Claim-making of British Settlements in the Spanish Peripheries of Darien, the Mosquito Coast, and the Yucatán Peninsula, c.1630 – c.1790.

By Nicholas Troy In 1787, to prevent conflict with Spain, the British colony of Black River – the central node in a dynamic contraband trade on the Mosquito Coast – was evacuated.  At the start of the same century, logger settlements in Yucatán and the Scots colony in Darien paid the price for defying Spanish […]

Read More →

Why You Have (Probably) Never Heard of the Gulf of Fonseca, and What that Means for its Archaeology

Thinking about the media, colonialization, nation-building discourses and their impact on the reconstruction of the precolonial past in Southern Central America. By Marie Kolbenstetter The Gulf of …what? Fair enough – it is not the biggest of Gulfs, and if you have never been to this neck of the woods, or if your research doesn’t have […]

Read More →

Freedom and Sovereignty: Notes on 1826 Haitian Rural Code

By Bethânia Santos Pereira President Jean-Pierre Boyer, who ruled Haiti between 1818 and 1843, was responsible for achieving a relative moment of internal political stability in the country: he unified the entire island, which removed possible conflicts with the reign of Henry Christophe as well as the Spanish crown, he managed to negotiate the recognition […]

Read More →