Migrants and their Networks in Transnational Science Communication

Feature Image: Occupations of Polish professionals in Latin America, 1820-1890 (Author’s own). By Aleksandra Kaye Sticking rigidly to the confines of a single discipline can be quite limiting. When I started thinking about my research focused on understanding the Polish migrants’ role in the circulation, production and communication of scientific knowledge in Latin America and […]

Read More →

Exodus: Afrikaners in Kenya

By Inaya Khan Colonialism not only encouraged the emigration of white populations from Europe to Africa but also circulations of such populations within the African continent itself. Kenya was formally annexed as a Crown colony in 1920 – a twentieth century experiment in the exertion of British hegemony, predominantly through agricultural settlement rather than trade. […]

Read More →

Sino-Persian Exchange Along the Silk Road

What do the words for “lion” (狮子shīzi), “spinach” (菠菜bōcài), and “grape” (葡萄 (pútáo) all have in common in Chinese? They all derive, directly or indirectly, from either Persian roots or are otherwise etymologically or conceptually linked to Iran. Just how far back can ties between ancient China and early Iranian societies in Central Asia be […]

Read More →

Ways to Track Down a Transnational Movement: Esperanto, Warsaw, and Polish Doctors

By Marcel Koschek Capturing networks and movements may be particularly difficult when they stretch across different countries and the sources seem unproductive at first glance. However, this piece will attempt to make precisely such a transnational movement accessible and also visualisable. The movement in mind here is the Esperanto movement. Esperanto – a planned language […]

Read More →

The “Great Civilizer”: The Global Diffusion of the Sewing Machine and its Impact on Greece during the Late 19th-early 20th Century

 By Argyrios Sakorafas The second half of the 19th century signifies the dawn of a new era, marked by unprecedented changes in the social, economic and technological level.[1] These changes, combined with the establishment of a capitalistic market and the steady rise in income per capita, produced a new range of consumer goods, such as […]

Read More →

Bringing India to Form: Hatano Uho and the Indian Rebellion of 1857

By Aaron Peters During the Asia-Pacific War (1937-1945) as Japan was extending its wartime empire across China and Southeast Asia to the borders of British India, a Japanese-language history of the Indian Rebellion of 1857 was published in May 1942 under the title, “India’s Independence War” (Indo dokuritsu sensō, 印度独立戦争). Its author was a man […]

Read More →

South Asian Indentured Labour

By Maureen McCord Why did so many South Asians, in the early years of the nineteenth century, choose to become indentured laborers, signing five years of their lives away to work on sugar plantations in Mauritius? Previous work on the earliest years of Indian indentured labor—a labor practice which eventually spread from this small Mascarene […]

Read More →

Double Trouble: Historicizing “Locusts” in the Vocabulary of Disease Discourse from Cholera to COVID-19

By Pallavi Das At the close of 2019, when the world was preparing to ring in the new year, two scourges were preparing to intensify their impact upon the world. On one hand, was the novel coronavirus that was wreaking havoc in China. On the other, was the locust infestation that had been plaguing the […]

Read More →

Malayan Railway

By Dhevarajan Devadas Standing shuttered along Keppel Road today, the Tanjong Pagar Railway Station has witnessed the passing of Singapore’s colonial, post-war and post-independence eras. Once envisioned as “one of the most important nodal points in the whole world’s scheme of communications”, the station was buffeted by the evolution of transportation and the immense political […]

Read More →

A Gaping Wound: Remembering the Falklands War in post-dictatorship Argentina

By Lula Murphy On a misty morning in 1982, Argentine forces disembarked on the Falkland Islands, beginning a war with the UK that ended with a death toll of 649 Argentine soldiers, 255 British soldiers, and three islanders.[1] However, the 74-day conflict which began that 2nd April was a new chapter in an older dispute […]

Read More →